RRSP Shortcomings and the value of INTEGRIS

by Jean-Pierre Laporte July 17, 2012
RRSPs are wonderful tools to build oneself a retirement nest-egg. Unfortunately, they also suffer from a few short-comings, deficiencies that INTEGRIS has been engineered to overcome.

Firstly, they are retail products. This translates in higher fees than is required. After all, financial institutions must pay commissions to investments advisors (salespeople) to get you to buy in. INTEGRIS doesn't charge a commission (often called a 'trailer' in industry talk). And because many RRSP providers have to compensate the salespeople upfront, they also slip in "deferred sales charges", in other words, penalties you have to pay to move your money to a new RRSP provider. INTEGRIS doesn't play those games, we only get paid when we deliver immediate value, and our fees are broken down to the last cent so you always know how further ahead you are.

Moreover, the tax laws cap the total tax deductions available to you when contributing to an RRSP. INTEGRIS is governed by pension tax laws, this means that you can always exceed the RRSP limits. In addition, because of the fact that INTEGRIS is a pension plan, a number of additional tax deduction that are unavailable in an RRSP exist: administration fees and investment fees, interest charges on borrowings etc. These allow an incorporated professional to acquire a larger pension with pre-tax dollars instead of using after-tax dollars. Finally, while RRSPs make sense for those who have the expertise and time to monitor their investments for many others, playing the stock markets is not an option. INTEGRIS gives those who would rather focus on their business the opportunity to invest through an age-appropriate life cycle fund that progressively immunizes one's assets from market volatility as one approaches retirement age.